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20100901
20100930
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KQED (PBS) 19
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English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
is important and facebook is a consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis,
tasks smoothly and easily. it allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developed ways to repair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at brown university and co-founder of a company called c
and in congress is if you propose something that's bold, that touches these third rails, the other side will use it as a political weapon against you so don't dare try. we have to get off, if we court start tackling the fiscal problem, it will tack ale lot. what i do the point i'm trying to make is we do this now and get our prosperity agenda. what i mean when i say this is my plan says nothing changes for anybody 35 and above. -- 55 and above, so if you are 10 years away from retiring we can guarantee your benefit, if you are 54 and below you know the programs won't be the samement you know that the social insurance safety net system we have is imploding. we need to reform it to fix it. i use a few values and principals on how i fix those things am i go kif-- i can give you details if you like. the point i make is do it now, preema debt crisis, if he kick the can down the road it will be austerity to everybody. tax increases to current workers that is the pain plan we should avoid that. >> rose: i meant by dismantle, just dismantle in the traditional way that it works. in other words, you can u
writes the autobiography of our species. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportion
, it's going to make us stronger, as if he operates in a parallel universe that bears no relation to reality. >> charlie: as you suggested to me earlier, you have never seen a head of state that you think is prepared to say more untruths? >> i have never in my life seen a head of state look an interviewer in the eye -- look the camera straightforward and lie about something he knows the international community has been filled about the stories -- the story of the stoning. he said, "no one has been accused -- condemned to stoning in iran." for three weeks, that was the top of the news inside and iran and outside iran. he looked into the camera and he said, "i am the head of state, i say no one was stoned, end of story." >> charlie, whenever i watch ahmadinejad doing interviews, i am reminded of a famous "seinfeld" episode where george costanza asked the secret of lying and george said to jerry "it's not a lie if you believe it" and sometimes i think ahmadinejad is delusional, he believes that iran is the freest country in the world, he believes it has an incredibly prosperous econo
difficulties or challenges which might come from the mineral development, this would be the issue for us. >> rose: china and mongolia next. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring the jobs, tourist beaches, and businesses impacted by the spill. we've paid over $400 million in claims and set up a $20 billion independently-run claims fund. i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tung chee hwa is here. he is the chairman of the china united states exchange foundation. it aims to build greater understanding between the world's two largest economies. he is the former chief executive of hong kong, he has a long, close tie with the chinese leadership. he is currently vice chairman of the national committee of the chinese people's political consultant conference, the mainland's top political advisory body. i am very please
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
. mark may have a different opinion about that, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think i
%. give us the lowest corporation tax in the g-7. and that is a huge advert in this program, by the way, it is a good low corporate tax environment. >> rose: that's what ireland did exactly. >> and i think now they were able to take it quite a lot further than 24%. but nevertheless, from we're taking it from 28% to 24%. if you think of many people in my situation, many people sitting in a room like this, in faced with a very high budget deficit we would be very tempted to put up business taxes. but because, precisely because i want to give-- given growth and private sector investment and job creation, that i'm actually going in the other direction and reducing business taxes. >> rose: but the president is making in the united states the exact opposite decision. >> every country has got to make his own decisions. and the american administration has got challenges just like the british government has got. challenges. but actually, if you look at, from what i can gather, the u.s. administration is concerned about infrastructure. we've concerned about infrastructure. we're protecting the ca
and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conver
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)